Experilous

Another game jam down, another toy game/prototype to show for it! Drunkle is based on the theme “two button controls”, and was made with the help of returning team members Nathan, Peter, and Luke.

Drunkle seems to keep getting himself excessively inebriated. Help him navigate the precarious hallways of disreputable inns and taverns so that he can reach the exit before he makes a terrible mess.

As usual for projects I do in Unity, you can play directly from your browser, or grab the Windows 32-bit or Windows 64-bit build.

If you were a participant in Ludum Dare 34, we’d welcome your ratings and feedback on the Ludum Dare entry page. (more…)

Reviews of my Ludum Dare 32 game Deserializer are going well! Feedback has been very positive, but has also provided some useful critiques. I’m looking forward to the rankings being finalized and published Monday evening.

But I haven’t been sitting still. Although I’m proud of what I accomplished in three days, I know that the game is far from perfect. I believe that the core mechanic of a Frogger-style play field and movement plus pattern-matching is solid, but the specific type of pattern matching and its associated mechanics are definitely not ideal. So yesterday I spent some time away from the computer doing some paper prototyping. After a few iterations of conjuring up and tweaking new rules, I believe I’ve found a game objective that will work better. Allow me to describe a bit of the process I went through. (more…)

A yellow exploding avatar which had just gotten hit by an <EOF>

Death by <End of File>

Ludum Dare 32 is over! It’ll be three weeks before ratings are completed and I find out how well I placed, but I already feel like my experience this weekend counts as a smashing success.

My entry is Deserializer, a vaguely Frogger-like game of network packet sniffing. The objective is to steal the system password by deserializing passing packets of data, without getting caught and blocked from the system.

Play it now using the experimental Unity WebGL build. Also available is standalone executable for Windows (packaged as a 7z file, 64-bit, 32-bit, or packaged as a zip file, 64-bit, 32-bit).

So what makes me feel like this is already a big success? (more…)

Time to take a break from Worldbuilder development, for it is once again a Ludum Dare weekend! This time I’m going to try out Unity 5.0. I’ve dabbled in Unity 4.x in the past, but never quite felt comfortable enough with it to use it for rapid prototyping. I’m looking to remedy that by subjecting my inexperience to the fires of game jam hell.

But before Ludum Dare 32 officially starts, I did want to make sure I am capable of producing at least something playable in Unity in a short period of time, so I made a tiny little vertical shooter. Took around five lazy hours, so I’d say that’s a good sign that I’ll be able to pump something out over a 72-hour timespan. As long as I don’t get paralyzed by game design brain farts.

The game can be played using the experimental WebGL build or the Unity Web Player, and you can grab a Windows build, in 64-bit or 32-bit form. Controls are basic; AD/arrow keys to move left/right, and spacebar/left mouse button to fire. The points you get for each enemy destroyed are proportional to the number of enemies on the screen.

Okay, after a few nights of good sleep and days not thinking about coding, it’s time for a reflection on my efforts during this past weekend’s Ludum Dare. (For reference, my entry can be viewed here and played here).

As was evident in my earlier posts, I didn’t really have a clear idea of where I was going, design-wise. Even on the last day, I wasn’t quite sure where I would end up, though it was of course much clearer how little time I had left to add any additional mechanics. But I didn’t let that lack of direction prevent me from continuing onward anyway, so that was a success of sorts. All too often, if I don’t know where I’m going, I fail to go anywhere at all. (more…)

Three players running around the diamond for a home run.

A home run for 3 points!

Our Ludum Dare 31 entry is finally complete! For some loose definition of complete, anyway. It’s submitted and can poked and prodded, at the very least. Changes since the prior version were minor; I handled the game over state, added a little bit of variation to the pitch to visually indicate if it’s likely to be a ball or strike, included more animations for the runners to take them from 2nd to 3rd to home, and did some minor bug fixing. Haven’t yet discovered what rockets the ball into the sky every once in a while after hitting the back wall. Oh well, someone might find it amusing.

Play the final entry, and go rate it on my Ludum Dare entry page.

And now it is finally time to decompress!

Two more iterations today. Number seven added runners that actually run one base at a time, as well as foul balls and textual announcements of pertinent events. Number eight added regions to the play field that determine the type of play depending upon where the ball comes to rest.

I also have an amazing bug where the ball occasionally flies off into the stratosphere whenever it bounces off of the back wall, or otherwise magically teleports to a different spot on the field. I don’t think my code or my math could survive another day of game jamming. Good thing it’s over soon!

For my sixth iteration, I have added a short wind up animation for the invisible pitcher, to give the player a small heads up that the pitch is happening. I’ve also thrown in some occasionally buggy code to cause the ball to actually bounce off of the back wall, which happens to be infinitely high, despite appearances to the contrary. Sorry, no home runs.

Something is starting to come together, although that “something” is yet to be a game exactly. My fifth published iteration now has score keeping, bouncing balls, a pitching/swinging mechanic, and a wall at the end of the outfield (which magically doesn’t stop balls). It works again on mobile too, though the touch event lag that most browsers introduce causes a serious amount of annoyance when batting.

Two base runners running between home, first and second, with a ball in the air.

Base runner sprites from Jeremy.

Beginning to get some mechanics in, though I don’t like the feel of them yet. The third prototype introduced new base runner sprites from Jeremy, a “Bat” button, and a non-functional ability to specify which area of the field you wish to target for batting. The fourth prototype made the batting target functional, and added some priority options for batting: chance to hit the ball at all, the power of the hit, and the precision with which it is hit. In the background, strikes, balls, outs, and innings are being tracked, but not the score. And I seem to have broken the mobile touch interface; it will come back in a future version. (more…)

Baseball diamond with multiple blue ellipses running around the bases, and multiple balls in the air.

Out of control elliptical base runners. Who needs rules?

Last night’s brainstorm resulted in very little that was inspiring. “Entire game on one screen” wasn’t exactly a creatively compelling theme. But Jeremy and I chose to go with a baseball-esque theme, with no scrolling of the ball field or extra panels for information. I was hoping I’d be able to come up with some abstraction and modification of baseball mechanics that still retained a core element of fun, but my design efforts didn’t result in many promising thoughts. Before I went to bed, however, I insisted I throw together a tech demo of the ball/shadow graphics that Jeremy recommended. You can view that in my first prototype (just click, touch, or press spacebar to launch baseballs with random trajectories).

In order to give Jeremy something solid to work with for creating some sprites for the players, I added a diamond and some blue elliptical base runners, and subtly improved the size and shadowing of the balls. You can see that in the second prototype.

Now it’s time to actually add some legitimate game mechanics, while Jeremy works on sprites.

U+2603:  Snowman Symbol

U+2603: The theme for LD31?

Only three hours remaining until the theme for Ludum Dare 31 is announced. I’m gonna have a go at it again, preferably with far more success than Ludum Dare 30. I’ve been in a rather good mental state this past week, and am well rested, so I’m optimistic. And the possibility that the Unicode Snowman will be the chosen theme doesn’t scare me. Not that I have any idea for what I’d make for that theme or any other. I’m fully in the just-wing-it mode of thinking for this one. We’ll see how that goes.

I’m assisted this time by Jeremy Breau of Antithesis Design. The media assets he’ll be creating will no doubt be far better than any weak vector art I would throw together, and having a partner with whom to share the design efforts is always rad.

Meanwhile, the very encouraging interest from Hacker News and reddit this past week, along with a very insightful business suggestion from a friend, has me reconsidering my plans regarding my planet generator. (more…)

Ludum Dare 30 Retrospective

Physical prototype with Risk cubes and LEGO axles.

Physical prototype with Risk cubes and LEGO axles.

Not that there’s much on which to retrospect, since I threw in the towel less than a day into the game jam.  My brain simply was unable to appropriately concentrate on the task at hand, no matter how much I tried.  Eventually I decided to simply cut my mental losses and not burn an entire weekend on a stressful activity that was clearly going nowhere.

Part of the problem was certainly that I had some personal stuff on my mind.  While that overall fact obviously impacted my efficacy with the jam, the details are irrelevant.  But there were some aspects of my mental processes that are very relevant to a retrospective.  First, and of course most notably, I’ll cover what went poorly, followed by those few elements that actually went well.  Such as the physical prototyping you see here on the right. (more…)

It’s time for the Ludum Dare game jam, once again.  This trimester I’ll be doing the 3-day jam rather than the 2-day competition, since I might have some outside assistance, and my schedule doesn’t really line up well with a Sunday evening deadline.

As before I’ll probably use the HTML5/JavaScript/CreateJS/jQuery combo, and take advantage of any of the code from my prior two jams or the other prototypes available here on my site.

Although I’ll note that I’m tempted by the recent release of the Unity 4.6 public beta, and the new GUI contained within.  Trouble is, I’m not very proficient with Unity, so it would definitely slow me down during a jam.  For some reason, every time I use Unity, I very quickly find myself confused by urges to fight the engine, rather than work with it.  So if I go the Unity route, the entire purpose of the jam will simply be to have any game completed to a playable state, whether innovative, fun, or otherwise.

If I focus on game mechanics, however, innovation is generally my objective.  This time around, I’m toying with a game style inspired by collectible card games like Magic:  The Gathering or Hearthstone.  Note the word “inspired”, as I don’t intend to literally create a card game.  But there are a lot of fascinating elements that I think can carry over into other game styles, and I’ve recently been working on doing that with some of my larger projects.  I don’t have anything to show for those larger projects yet, though, so this might push me to test the waters with some concrete functionality.  Always a valuable benefit of doing a game jam.

(crossposted to ludumdare.com)

What a confusing tangled mess!

Ludum Dare is over, and my entry, Symptomatic, can be viewed here.  (If you want to judge the entry on the Ludum Dare site, you can find it here.)  The non-competition jammers are probably wrapping up their 72-hour game jam entries as I type, but having done the 48-hour competition, I’ve had the luxury of relaxing for a full 24 hour already.  Time to look back and reflect. (more…)

hex grid cells with channels and a path

Drawing a path.

More than halfway through the competition, and I can only now finally interact with the program.  I guess I’ve gotten to the point where I’ve made the toy.  And I’ll admit, it’s kinda fund just doodling around with the path.  A little confusing at times, though; it isn’t the most intuitive interface.  Ah well.

Now to add in the disease and symptoms, in order to give the player some information to go off of, in order to guess at the actual channel arrangements.

So tangled!

I now have a notion of a game world, consisting of both the actual state of cells and their channel arrangements, as well as the player’s guessed arrangements.  (Not that there’s yet any interface to let the player guess.)  Here’s the latest screenshot; click for a full-size version.

To be honest, I’m surprised that there aren’t too many small cycles.  Pure randomness already does a decent job of generating long meandering paths.  I was worried that I might need to massage the random data some to get it into a more useful form, but I might be able to work with this as is.

Cells with all 15 possible routes.

Cells with all 15 possible routes.

As indicated in my previous post, I’m currently going for a game loosely inspired by Minesweeper and SpaceChem.  So I have routes that an object will follow, as in SpaceChem, and these routes will be hidden by default, but the player will guess what they are based on other information, as in Minesweeper.

Colors don’t mean anything, but are just to help distinguish overlapping paths.  I might remove them if I find that a single color or style is still sufficiently clear.  Adding borders along the channel edges might be enough.

This was just rendering.  Next step will be to get an actual concept of the game world created, and then determine my input model.  After that, it’ll be time to introduce a pathogen.

Ludum Dare #29 just started, and I’m jumpin’ in by blogging my first thoughts.  The theme is “Beneath the Surface”. (more…)

Over a week after completing my Ludum Dare entry, I think I’m finally ready to write up a postmortem.  I needed that time, because the project wore me out.  I’m not even sure I felt like I worked that aggressively, but I think my awareness of the deadline magnified the sense of exhaustion.  It was my first game jam, though.  Maybe next time I’ll be a bit better adapted to the experience. (more…)